Guest Blogpost: Richard Lynch on Inflation

There was a further fall in inflation in February, the latest month for which figures are available, but prices are still rising faster than wages and than in competitor economies.

The figures for the year to end February 2012 (with end January figures in brackets) are as follows:

Retail Prices Index (RPI)                                                                –                              3.7% (3.9%)

RPI excluding mortgage interest (RPIX)  –                              3.8% (4.0%)

Consumer Prices Index (CPI)                                      –                              3.4% (3.6%)

The main downward pressure on the RPI came from price rises in motoring expenditure and fuel and light, while the main downward pressure on the CPI came from domestic electricity and gas, recreation, transport and electrical goods.

Nonetheless there were still upward pressures on both the main indices. For the RPI these included: alcohol and tobacco (6.1%), beef (11.6%), lamb (13.2%), pork (9.1%), butter (10.3%), coffee and beverages (13.7%), electricity (10.1%), gas (17.5%) and vehicle tax and insurance (10.9%). Upward pressure on the CPI included increased costs of fuels and lubricants (5.3%), education (5.1%), jewellery, clocks and watches (8.6%) and transport insurance (11.6%).

UK inflation, as measured by the CPI, is now only the seventh highest in the EU but is above the EU average of 3% and the Eurozone average of 2.7%. It is equal to the inflation rate in Italy but is higher than in France and Germany (2.5%), Spain (1.9%), Greece (1.7%) and Sweden (1%). The UK rate is also higher than that in China (3.2%), the US (2.9%), Switzerland (-1.2%) and Japan (0.5%).

Predictions are that inflation will fall further over coming months but these are likely to be affected by the current record high prices for oil, anticipated higher prices for food, and the increase in the price of postage stamps (by 14p to 60p for first class and by 14p to 50p for second class).

Richard Lynch is a Dudden Hill resident. He is a retired Unite the Union official and currently conducts voluntary work on employment rights for the Brent Community Law Centre. He also acts as an accompanying representative for the GMB union.

Guest Blogpost from Richard Lynch: Inflation down but still too high

UK inflation fell in December, for the third month in succession, and is now only the third highest in the EU. However it continues to be high by the standards of the past 20 years and is still rising at double the rate of pay increases. The figures for the year to December 2011 (with year to end November figures in brackets) are as follows:

Retail Prices Index (RPI)                                 –        4.8% (5.2%)

RPI excluding mortgage interest (RPIX)          –        5.0% (5.3%)

Consumer Prices Index (CPI)                         –        4.2% (4.8%)

The falls in all the main indices were the result of heavy discounting on the high street during the period around Christmas and falls in prices of food, fuel, clothing and recreation/leisure.

Despite this, there were still some steep price hikes. The CPI figures, for example, showed big year-on-year increases in the prices of oils and fats (13%), coffee, tea and cocoa (9.6%), tobacco (11.8%), electricity (14.1%), gas (19.8%) and house contents insurance (21%). The RPI figures showed many equally high increases, including in the prices of beef (10.6%), lamb (17.5%), oils and fats (14.4%), coffee and hot drinks (12.9%), tobacco (11.8%), electricity (14.1%), gas (19.6%) and vehicle tax and insurance (18.6%).

Overall UK inflation may have fallen in December but it is still high by international standards. In the EU, our 4.2% CPI rate is below the rate in Slovakia (4.6%) and Poland (4.5%) but is well above rates in Germany (2.3%), Spain (2.4%), France (2.7%), the Euro Area (2.7%), the EU as a whole (3.0%) and Italy (3.7%). UK inflation is also higher than in Switzerland    (-0.4%), Japan (-0.2%), the USA (3.0%) and China (4.1%).

Further falls in UK inflation are expected over coming months as reductions in utility prices kick in and the effect of last year’s VAT increase drops out of the annual comparisons.

*The latest Inflation figures are (RPI 3.9%, CPI 3.6%) 

Richard Lynch is a Dudden Hill resident. He is a retired Unite the Union official and currently conducts voluntary work on employment rights for the Brent Community Law Centre. He also acts as an accompanying representative for the GMB union.

Guest Blog Post: Richard Lynch on UK inflation – now the highest in Europe

The most recent statistics have shown inflation falling slightly but most UK prices are still rising fast and our inflation is now the highest in Europe. The figures for the year to end October 2011 (with end September figures in brackets) show the following:

Retail Prices Index (RPI)-5.4% (5.6%)

RPI excluding mortgage interest (RPIX)-5.6% (5.7%)

Consumer Prices Index (CPI)-5.0% (5.2%)

The modest fall in all indices came largely from falls in the cost of food (due to “significant and widespread discounting by supermarkets” and good harvests for certain produce), air fares and petrol. However, there were also significant upward pressures from increases in the price of clothing, electricity and gas.

Amongst the factors keeping the CPI annual figure high were increases in the prices of fuels and lubricants (15.4%), gas (24.1%), electricity (14.9%) and bread/cereals (6.2%). Factors affecting the RPI included increases in the prices of fuel and light (20.2%), tobacco (13.4%) and motoring (7.7%).

All of this helped the UK continue its climb up the European inflation league and, after passing out Estonia, our CPI has now become the highest in the entire European Union.  Our 5% rate is head and shoulders above the EU average (3.4%) and the Eurozone average (3%). We are also well ahead of competitors like Italy (3.8%), Spain (3%), Germany (2.9%) and France (2.5%). We also have higher inflation than China (4.2%), the USA (3.5%), Japan (-0.2%) and Switzerland (-0.5%).

Who says the coalition is not capable of world-beating performances!

Update: November’s inflation figures have been published since the above article was written. They show the RPI down slightly at 5.2% and the CPI down to 4.8%.

Richard Lynch is a Dudden Hill resident. He is a retired Unite the Union official and currently conducts voluntary work on employment rights for the Brent Community Law Centre. He also acts as an accompanying representative for the GMB union.

Tories should be fighting for Britain’s interests. Not fighting with each other about Europe

Ed Miliband has got it spot on on this news piece on his website – LINK

Last night we saw what we thought were remnants of an old age problem with the Tories re-emerge as a mainstream split in the Party.

But why Europe? Ex-London Young Labour Chair Christine Quigley  tweeted:

 

picture from NavinShah.com

And she is right. Looking at the list of rebels, I noted the name of a former leader of Brent Council who is now the MP for Harrow East.

 

Pictured here holding a pledge signed by himself to vote against tuition fee increases, tuition fees were clearly not as strong an issue to rebel against as Europe.