TfL Disability Campaign

TfL are currently running a campaign called ‘Come on Board’ which targets older and disabled groups, providing them with information and support to aid travel across London’s public transport network.

If there are any local groups who they feel may benefit from a visit by TfL as part of this campaign email transport.strategy@brent.gov.uk with details of the group which will be passed to TfL.

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Please offer me a seat trial on public transport

Following the success of the ‘Please offer me a seat’ trial, Transport for London has announced the badge and card will be introduced on a permanent basis early next year.
 
The ‘Please offer me a seat’ badge and card were trialled to help customers who need a seat, but have difficulty getting one. The trial was a response to feedback from customers and research conducted last year, which found people with invisible impairments, conditions and injuries can often find it difficult to get a seat when they need one – particularly if their need is not obvious.
 
The trial was met with extremely positive reviews:
·        Participants reported 72 per cent of journeys as being easier as a result of the badge;
·        On 86 per cent of journeys participants reported feeling more confident when asking for a seat on public transport; and
·        An overwhelming 98 per cent of participants said they would recommend the badge and card to somebody they think needs or would benefit from one.
 
TfL is planning to launch the badge and card to all customers who need one early next year. Many customers may of course not want to use the badge and card, and TfL has committed make sure people are supported too. 
 
If you sign up to receive accessible travel updates by visiting www.tfl.gov.uk/emailupdates, TfL will let you know when our new badge and card is live.

Sadiq delivers Night Tube for Dudden Hill residents

Sadiq Khan has delivered on the Night Tube for Dudden Hill residents. The ward is well served by the Jubilee Line with residents using Willesden Green, Dollis Hill and Neasden Stations.

Starting from tonight, Tube services will now run on Friday and Saturday nights on the full length of the Jubilee line from Stanmore to Stratford.

TfL has confirmed that all the stations will remain staffed throughout the night and that services will run approximately every 10 minutes.

This is in addition to the pledge already delivered on the Hopper fare for buses. For more information on this, visit the TfL advice site here LINK

Labour’s candidate for the 2012 Mayoral elections Ken Livingstone pledges to cut fares by 5%

I welcome the pledge from the Labour Party’s candidate for the 2012 London Mayoral election Ken Livingstone to reduce fares by 5% in Autumn 2012 if elected in May next year.

People in Dudden Hill Ward are telling me all the time about their dissatisfaction with the tube service increasing whilst at the same time, fares are also increasing.

Details of Ken’s policy can be found here LINK

The cost of transport has a major impact on the income that ordinary workers take home as travel costs do take quite a chunk out of people’s wage earnings. This is exactly what we need to help people get on and Ken’s pledge is very welcome.

Time for the excuses to stop – Boris Johnson needs to get a grip on the Jubilee Line

1996 stock used on Jubilee Line by London Unde...
WikiImage

New figures published by TfL (Transport for London) have shown a further decline in tube services under Boris Johnson with overall delays up by 16% across the underground network.

Dudden Hill residents mainly commute using Jubilee Line underground stations as this formerly well run service is the only tube line permanently stopping at Willesden Green, Dollis Hill and Neasden underground station.

The latest TfL figures show in the last year, from March 2010 to March 2011, show delays on the Jubilee Line Jubilee line are up 120%!!!!!

The figures come from TfL’s own website: LINK (click on the delays tab).

As tube delays have increased in the past year, Boris Johnson has made excuse after excuse. In February this year he blamed Transport for London (the organisation he chairs), in March he tried to blame it on strikes and then in April he even tried to shift the blame on to the statistics rather than accept responsibility.

Boris must be held accountable to the misery he has caused to tube passengers.

The over-running Jubilee Line upgrade should be complete at Easter but Mayor Boris Johnson lost his grip on the issue

Dollis Hill Tube Station
Image by Ben.Harper via Flickr

The latest update on works to the Jubilee line is that the over running works should be completed by Easter.

The Mayor Boris Johnson has totally failed Dudden Hill residents on this issue. I was out knocking on doors in my ward last week and asked a resident who lives close to Dollis Hill tube station what she thought about the tube service on weekends. Her response saddened me.

She said, “I don’t consider it an issue. It’s just something that I’ve factored into my life. We don’t have a tube service on weekends.”

It shouldn’t have to be like this, I thought. What’s even worse is when the service is running during the week there are delays, often at crucial times when people are just trying to get to work and earn a living. Furthermore we get unprecedented hikes in tube fares to go with this lack of weekend service and delays.

This is unacceptable. The time for Boris to get a grip on this issue has passed; he has already lost it.

Crackdown on serial graffiti vandal

An ASBO has been given to a graffitist who has been the culprit of eyesores in Dudden Hill, Willesden and Kilburn – as well as on the tube and rail networks. His graffiti damage has cost Brent Council more than £1,800 to clean up.

If any residents have issues regarding anti-social behaviour they should call the Brent Safer Neighbourhood Team on 0300 123 1212 or Brent Anti Social Behaviour Team on 0208 733 3932 or 0208 733 3940.

Tube Strike hits London, but what is our Mayor doing about it?

Huge queues outside bus stops, lots of road traffic; both cars and bikes, and London losing out on £50 million today according to the Daily Mail.

So why the strike?

Well, the strikes are over 800 jobs that are proposed to be axed… yes 800!!!

An estimated 90% of stations affected by the staff reductions will be in outer London. The controversy is that the now Mayor Boris Johnson actively campaigned on a ticket to save jobs at ticket offices, quite deceivingly, as it was never Ken’s intention to leave stations that were under TfL control totally unmanned.

Ken Livingstone highlighted a campaign we championed in Brent in the Harrow Times to highlight the importance of staff at tube stations:

1996 stock used on Jubilee Line by London Unde...
WikiImage

He said, “we had a huge campaign about four years ago because a banker was stabbed to death as he left Kensal Rise station, which was unmanned.

“I gave a commitment that all the stations that came under the control of TfL would have staff in them.

“Nobody wants to come out of the station at 11pm seeing that there’s no one on the platform and no one on the barrier.”

My electoral ward includes two major underground stations on the Jubilee Line (Neasden and Dollis Hill) and borders another (Willesden Green). Leaving these stations unmanned will be an invitation to criminals. Presence prevents crime.

So what has been the Mayor Boris Johnson’s approach?

In the lead up to the strikes, HE DIDN’T EVEN MET THE UNION LEADERS TO NEGOTIATE!!!!!

This is the most barmy part of it all. During the 2008 London Mayoral election campaign, Boris said that he would move to negotiate a no strike deal with the Unions. Yesterday, it emerged that in what is set to be a disruptive ordeal for many Londoners, that he hasn’t even intervened personally to try and strive for a resolution. All we’ve seen from him is some media interviews.

London needs a Mayor that’s about action in this strained economic climate. Not one that leaves the work to his officers. After all, the Mayor of London is a serious role, not a ceremonial one.

Navin Shah AM slams worst Dial-A-Ride statistics in London

Navin Shah AM, The London Assembly Member for Brent and Harrow today slammed new statistics revealing Brent and Harrow had the worst refusal rates for Dial-A-Ride journeys in London.

source: BBC

The statistics, released at the July Mayor’s Question Time, show the refusal rate – the percentage of journey requests turned down due to lack of capacity – in both boroughs are considerably above average. While the Londonwide average refusal rate is 7.5%, 13.8% of requests in Harrow, and 12.9% of requests in Brent were turned down.

Navin Shah said: “These statistics confirm the anecdotal evidence I hear regularly. While TfL tell us Dial-A-Ride is getting better, constituents continue experiencing problems booking a ride. I’ve written to TfL to ask for urgent targeted improvements in North West London and I’ll certainly be following this up when the Assembly next questions the Mayor.”

“Dial A Ride in North West London needs to be improved urgently. I would urge any dissatisfied customers to contact me at City Hall with their experiences and I will raise them with Transport for London.”

Last London Mayor’s Question Time of the Decade

A special thanks to oSource: london.gov.ukur London Assembly Member Navin Shah who asked a few questions to London Mayor Boris Johnson directly affecting Dudden Hill residents at the last Mayor’s Question Time of the decade. Navin was elected as Brent and Harrow’s Assembly Member in 2008.

See Below:

“Particularly Challenging Problems”

Question No: 3739 / 2009

Navin Shah

What are the “particularly challenging problems” Tube Lines are facing at Neasden and Wembley Park?

Answer from the Mayor:

The issues Tube Lines face at Neasden and Wembley Park are because the track and signalling layout in these areas is especially complex, largely as a result of the depot at Neasden.

In this area there are numerous points and crossings which control the movement of both Jubilee and Metropolitan line trains, and each line crosses the path of the other at regular points, especially towards the entrance to the Neasden depot.  The new Jubilee line signalling will need to interface with the Metropolitan line signalling in the area.

Neasden Station

Question No: 3740 / 2009

Navin Shah

What work is required to bring the Metropolitan Line platforms at Neasden station to a safe and useable level?

Answer from the Mayor:

Work would be required to repair the uneven platform surfaces and edges and remove vegetation.  Lighting, signage and CCTV would need to be installed.

Furthermore, because the former access route to/from the northbound Metropolitan line platform now forms part of the ticket office, customers would be required to exit via the Jubilee line platforms and a subway at the north end of the station, which is currently used by staff only.

The subway requires substantial work before customers can use it, as lighting, flooring and wall surfaces are below standard and in poor condition.  In addition, there is no information or safety signage.

Extending Bus Route

Question No: 3741 / 2009

Navin Shah

Brent Council installed a bus stand and toilet on Church Road, NW10, in the expectation that a bus route would be extended to this area, which has limited bus routes. When will the Mayor actually extend a bus route that will use this facility and improve transport for this deprived local community?

Answer from the Mayor:

The bus stand at Church Road was installed as part of a road scheme designed, in part, to enable increased housing provision in the area.  TfL was involved in the development of this scheme and welcomed the improved bus infrastructure provided.  However, no commitment was given for its immediate use as the area is currently well served by three high frequency services which are adequate for the existing level of demand and which provide good links to the surrounding area.  When additional housing is developed demand will increase and TfL will reassess any business case for service extensions at this time.

Track Inspections

Question No: 3742 / 2009

Navin Shah

How can the Mayor and Transport for London be sure that reducing the frequency of track inspections on the Jubilee line will not compromise passenger and staff safety? What advice was taken on the safety implications of this? Were staff and the unions consulted?

Answer from the Mayor:

The proposed reduction in the frequency of track inspections applies only to the newest section of the Line (the Jubilee Line Extension) and will only affect track patrolling.  All other track safety inspections will continue to be performed at the present frequency.

The London Underground standards currently require track patrolling to be undertaken at least twice per week. This compares to the track patrolling frequency of once per week mandated in the Network Rail standards for track with equivalent service duty (speed and tonnage). The primary reason for this difference in standards is the presence of the now obsolete Bullhead Track on much of the London Underground Network.

The Jubilee Line Extension was constructed with a modern track comprising continuously welded flat bottom rails on concrete sleepers. This track is identical to the track used on Network Rail and, as a result of its design, requires less maintenance and is less prone to defects and failures including broken rails.

The proposal to reduce the patrolling frequency on the Jubilee Line Extension is supported by a full safety analysis including risk assessment in accordance with the requirements of the London Underground Safety Management System. The safety justification was reviewed and approved by Tube Lines safety and engineering experts, in compliance with the full requirements of their Safety Review and Change Control procedure. Following approval within Tube Lines, a request for a concession to the London Underground Standard was submitted and reviewed by the LU Head of Track, our relevant engineering expert. The concession request was subsequently approved on the basis that there was adequate assurance that the proposed change would have no material detrimental effect on the safety of the railway service or staff.

A condition for the approval of the concession request was that Tube Lines ensured that staff and trade union representatives were adequately briefed about the proposed changes and the associated safety justification. Tube Lines have subsequently confirmed that this has been done.